Are bookworm stereotypes true? Who the heck actually knows

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Hello, my fellow lovelies :)

Stereotyping is a part of our society, and one that have many expectations when it comes to readers and who they are and what they do. Are they true? Are they not true? Yes. Truth is, everyone’s different and some may identify with these stereotypes, while others may not. That said, some of these stereotypes can be frustrating when it comes to when people actually expect them to be true. 

I came up with a list of over 40 stereotypes that immediately spring to mind when thinking of readers and their “stereotypical tendencies,” picking only 12 of them to spotlight today, and whether they apply to moi. 

Reader stereotypes Cover to Cover Book Blog www.covertocoverlit.com blogging blog cover to cover1. READERS NEVER LEAVE HOME WITHOUT A BOOK. IT GOES TO MOVIES, TO RESTAURANTS AND TO THE BATHROOM. NO EXCEPTIONS

Okay, in this day and age, it isn’t exactly hard to carry a book with you wherever you go. With e-readers and, lo and behold, the Kindle app itself, it’s impossible for me not to. The library even made it’s way into my iPhone through an app (which I use ALWAYS). 

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I’m not planning on leaving the house anytime soon without my phone, especially with all my ebooks and audiobooks on them. But that doesn’t mean I don’t also have a paperback and hardcover chilling in my bag as well. What can I say? I can’t be a bookworm without my book! Also, what if a photo opportunity turns up and I don’t have my book with me to take pictures? This travesty happens every damn time my mom drags an innocent and unaware me to the flower shop.

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2. ALL READERS SECRETLY DREAM OF WRITING THE NEXT BEST-SELLER AND BECOMING A WORLD FAMOUS AUTHOR

After all, if readers can read as much as they do and critique all the writings of the world, surely they could write one themselves? Besides, if readers live in imaginary worlds all the time, it couldn’t be that hard to make up one of their own??

true or false Reader stereotypes Cover to Cover Book Blog www.covertocoverlit.com blogging blog cover to coverX Reader stereotypes Cover to Cover Book Blog www.covertocoverlit.com blogging blog cover to coverDespite this being my grandmothers most fervent dream, and my fathers hopes that I will be a hobby writer and then best-seller at 40 in order to set up me up for retirement (very practical, that one), this is not the case. I may have a way with words, but I’m not that imaginative. The problem with living in imaginary worlds all the time, is that it’s hard to come up with something original.

Reader stereotypes Cover to Cover Book Blog www.covertocoverlit.com blogging blog cover to cover3. BOOK WORMS WANT TO SPREAD THE JOY OF READING AND ARE WILLING TO LEND OUT BOOKS TO ANYONE AND EVERYONE, JUST HOPING SOMEONE WILL ENJOY THE STORY (AND POSSIBLY TALK ABOUT IT??)

Bookworms have books. It’s a little known fact. So when people happen to catch sight of their collection, mouths gape, drop open, and dry up in awe. Next comes the assumption that we are willing to lend out our books to be bent, crinkled, ate on and lost. “Can I borrow this?” a visitor would inevitably ask, holding up a beloved edition, no doubt already internally scheming where to lose it.

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THIS IS A FALSE STATEMENT. Book dragons are not a generous, benevolent folk. Book dragons hoard their treasure trove of novels, allowing no one to read or borrow or especially touch their prized editions!! This stereotype is completely false!!! At least for me. When it comes to lending my books, I’m !!!!!!

Basically I have no chill.

I’m all for nagging my friends and family (and followers, hi) to read my favorite books and wanting them to experience the same thing I did within its pages. But they will not be using my edition to do that, no sir-ee. I don’t care how awkward it is when someone asks, “can I borrow that?? I have overdue library fines that I can’t pay.” My coldhearted answer will always be a firm “NO.” But allow me to drive you to the bookstore.

Reader stereotypes Cover to Cover Book Blog www.covertocoverlit.com blogging blog cover to cover

4. READERS ARE ALWAYS VERY SMART AND VERY NERDY

Reading books makes us  i n t e l l i g e n t — clearly. Have you read my blog? It is the very height of cleverness. And buying several dark, twisty fantasy books and then discarding them for the fluffy contemporaries your mind is in the mood for (and doing this again and again) is a clear indicator of smarts. So is the fact that my redbubble cart has $658 worth of bookish stickers in it. Those will cover my laptop 56 times over! Also, readers always wear glasses. And everyone knows that glasses are a neon sign for intelligence. Just look at Harry Potter.

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I’ll admit, I’m pretty nerdy. And it’s a little known fact that books make people smarter, or at least help them think better. That being said … I use books to turn my brain off quite a bit. If I didn’t read before bed every night, regulating my thoughts and emotions, I’d probably stay awake all night just thinking about useless stuff and losing sleep. ( Just a note: I also don’t wear glasses, either. Another false! )

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5. THE BOOK IS ALWAYS BETTER 

Bad movie adaptations always have the potential to ruin my entire summer. Why watch the two-and-a-half hour inaccurate version with huge plot holes and actors that don’t match the characters when you can read the wonderfully right version?

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For the most part, this is pretty true. I mean, can we talk about Percy Jackson and the Sea of Monsters??? Utterly blah. Worst birthday present, ever. One of the reason’s I’ve always liked reading is that I have a movie in my mind – not to sound cliché, but I really do. And when I watch the real movie … it’s all wrong. Jace Wayland from the movie? Stop. Lily Collins, however? Yes, please! I will say, though, that I enjoy the Harry Potter movies almost as much as the books, if not more. Snape and Draco are absolutely A+ 

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6. BOOK WORMS ARE SNOBS AND ONLY READ THE CLASSICS. THE MORE “DOTH’S” AND “THOU’S,” THE BETTER

Don’t waste time with fluffy trash when you can pick up a good Tolstoy, Dickens or Bronte story. The classics are classics for a reason, for the timeless themes and the existential prose. Perusing through the airport’s trashy paperbacks just makes me lose faith in humanity. 

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Yeah. Trashy romance novels are kind of my guilty pleasure?? Admittedly, I haven’t read a Bronte, Dickens or Tolstoy book. Unless you count the Bronte sisters retelling that I read, the 30 pages I got through of A Tale of Two Cities and the book “Kissing Tolstoy” by Penny Reid that I loved. Sorry, but I like my books better. 

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7. ANY AND ALL TRAVEL EXCURSIONS ARE A SOURCE OF PANIC FOR PACKING

Wow, vacationing in San Diego, California for seven days over spring break! Great idea, mom and dad! Wait … what do you mean only one suitcase??? what am I supposed to do with my books, man

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Can I at least bring a suitcase and a backpack? Because this is 100% accurate. I pack everything that I think I will need for the trip, then add the books. Then I take out as many clothes as necessary so the books will fit :) Packing lightly really is an issue here — but can I really be expected to pack all my reading material with everything else in a single carry-on? You know I’ll need them. 

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8. ALL BOOK WORMS ARE AVID TEA OR COFFEE FANATICS

It’s a cozy image, isn’t it? I can easily picture myself sitting bundled up in sweaters and blankets, reading a cozy book by a roaring fire with a warm drink in hand. Hell, I’m doing it right now – if you substitute the book for a laptop? At least for now :)

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Yeah … that’s false. I don’t drink tea or coffee. Give me a nice hot chocolate any day, sure! And a smoothie or frozen lemonade in the warmer months, yes please! Truth is, I spend enough money on books. I literally cannot afford to get hooked on coffee or tea.

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9. READERS READ AND DO NOTHING ELSE – HENCE THE NAME

Can you imagine? Driving to school, reading at all the red lights and stop signs? Reading in the hallways and snuggled in alcoves with your nose stuck in a book? Eating in the library and going home to read some more? Sounds nice.

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Yeah … that’s a hard no. Until a year ago, I was a competitive dancer. Which meant practices almost every night after school until 930pm. Last year, I was the editor-in-chief for my schools 80-page news magazine. I may be a book blogger, but I’m not here often. It’s hard enough to find time to read nowadays. Did I mention I’m also a full-time student and have a job?

I know what you’re thinking … dayum. Because that’s what I’m thinking when I read back over that. Most readers, surprisingly, have lives! interesting. That doesn’t mean we’re not reading every little chance we can get, however. 

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10. BOOKWORMS ARE EITHER UGLY AND OVERWEIGHT OR SEXY LIBRARIANS. NO MIDDLE GROUND, APPARENTLY 

You know the type. The social introvert who hides in the library at lunch and wears shapeless clothing and has no friends so they just read. Or the adults who are “sexy librarians” with perfectly perched glasses, shiny hair and fitted clothing, who just happen to like reading. Or the first will be come the second once they find “the guy.” 

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We love stereotyping! I am neither of those things, and fit somewhere in between. 

Reader stereotypes Cover to Cover Book Blog www.covertocoverlit.com blogging blog cover to cover

11. BOOKWORMS ARE ANTI-SOCIAL, SHY CREATURES WHO ABHOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC. 

Avoid him. Don’t touch her. Ah! We’re making direct eye contact!! Hide!!!!! And he’s walking this way!!!!!!!!!! Phew, false alarm. He walked right past us. Can we go home yet? This is exhausting.

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Admittedly, I’m not an extrovert and exist with my introverted status proudly. And while “abhor the general public” is a sentence that sounds nice, it’s not how I operate. I’m not excessively social and like to be do things independently, but I also love chatting with people and making friends. Yes, I may be shy. But I’m hardly an anti-social creature who lives in a cage and never wants to leave.

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12. ALL READERS HATE THE GREAT OUTDOORS AND SHUN NATURE, PREFERRING TO STAY INDOORS, PASTY AND READING

Ah, yes. Ignore the foliage and the sunshine, let’s opt for the comfy recliner, cozy blanket and curled up position in between those things, book in hand and smile on face. We don’t need to go out there, only bad things exist there. Animals and bugs and grass and … sunshine. Ugh. Let’s just stay in and read to avoid that nonsense.

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Nah. Have you ever read outside? It’s very relaxing. I’ll admit, I’m an indoors person and don’t spend large amounts of time in the Great Outdoors. But whenever I do, I enjoy the sun on my face, breeze in my hair and the noises of nature.

Let's Chat on Cover to Cover Book and Blogging Blog

What kinds of stereotypes do you exhibit? Which ones do you disspell with pride? Where do you stand on any of these “bookworm cliches?” Let me know in the comments below, I’d love to hear from you! 

Kat from Cover to Cover Book and Blogging Blog


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